Blog Page 2

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tap water

We have been told to not drink from the tap time and time again. If you are ignoring what everybody has ever told you about tap water, you shouldn’t. Hot water dissolves contaminants quicker than cold water. Homes and apartment buildings contain many lead pipes. This lead has the capability to seep into water and potentially cause brain and nervous system damage. These dangers are especially more risky for children.

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moisture in home
Excess moisture in your home can cause mold growth.

Mold spores, invisible to the naked eye, can be found everywhere, both indoors and outdoors. Spores make their way into the home either through the air or after attaching to objects or people. Open windows, doorways and ventilation systems are all gateways through which spores can enter. Clothing, shoes and pets can all facilitate the arrival of mold within the home.

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save energy

Electric and energy bills are rising to expensive figures and many people are trying to find ways to cut on these cuts without sacrificing much from their current lifestyle. Here are some steps and tips you can take fairly easily that will help you with this current problem:

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Soft water

Magnesium and calcium are common in soil and on their own these minerals are really for the most part harmless.  However, when dissolved in our water supply they create hard water that can cause damage to your skin, hair and home.

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Fireplace Pollutants
Fireplaces can contribute to the pollutants in your home.

Pollutants in the home come from a variety of sources. It is mission critical to know what they are if you hope to limit their impact on your home.  Following is a list of common sources of indoor air pollution:

Fireplace Pollutants
Fireplaces can contribute to the pollutants in your home.
  • Combustion sources Any household appliances that use oil, gas, kerosene or even wood can lead to indoor air pollution. Such appliances include wood-burning stoves, fireplaces, water heaters, dryers, and stoves. It is very important to ensure these are properly maintained and routinely cleaned to limit their adverse impacts. Most heating sources in the US are one type of combustion source, and this is why indoor air pollution can be worse in winter.
  • Building materials such as insulation, carpeting and even furniture made of pressed wood. The kinds of pollutants that these items in the home may harbor or release are varied, including mold and dust mites.
  • Household cleaning and even personal care products such as air fresheners are constantly emitting pollutants during each use.
  • Hobby or home improvement activities Basically, if it produces fumes, it’s probably not good for you to be breathing it or filling your home with it. This is even worse when your home is sealed tight against winter temperatures and therefore limiting a healthy circulation of outside air.
  • Pets are definite contributors to air pollution in your home. Thing like dander and other particles from pets with fur or feathers are a major instigator of allergies and asthma to sensitive individuals. As both humans and pets stay inside more during the winter, the exposure and impact are worse during the cold months.

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toxic home syndrome

“Toxic Home Syndrome is where a person’s health deteriorates because of the air in their home – increasing the risk of cancer and heart disease”  according to this very interesting and informative piece in The Daily Mail.

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plants indoor air
Plants can help improve your home's air quality.

Here’ some quick tips you can take to immediately improve your home’s indoor air quality: